ASK Annual Seminar Series

Full Conference Details

ASK Annual Conference

November 4-5, 2016
This year ASK will also be offering professional training at the ASK Annual Conference. The theme of the conference is “Dyslexia and The Big Picture: Promoting The Positive”. The professional training sessions will be:

Morning Session: 9h registration, 9h30 to 12h30

  • The Effective Cognitive Neuroscience of Learning: Tools and strategies to turn failure into success for school and life by Prof. Rod Nicolson,
  • Les enfants à haut potentiel : les connaître pour adapter la pédagogie (théories et exemples) by Maria Pereira da Costa,

Afternoon Session: 13h15 to 16h15

  • Preventing Reading Failure with Screening and Intervention; Theory into Practice by Prof. Angela Fawcett,
  • Comment faciliter l’inclusion des élèves à besoins éducatifs particuliers dans ma classe? by Hélène Ribeiro.
Full Conference Details

2016-2017 Annual Seminar Series

Sensory Processing Difficulties: a ‘Neurological Traffic Jam’

Sensory processing describes the way we receive and interpret the incoming stimuli to our body’s 7 sensory structures; proprioception, vestibular, vision, auditory, tactile, olfactory and gustatory systems. These systems work together to help us to interpret the plethora of sensory stimuli we receive each day. Although sensory processing is typical to all, there are an increasing number of children and young people who have inconsistent organisation of sensory input, whereby incoming information becomes exacerbated, reduced or confused (neurological traffic jam) and their subsequent reactions may appear inappropriate and impede their educational progress.

Seminar Objectives:

  • To understand how sensory dysfunction can impact on functioning
  • Utilising theories of sensory Integration to explain this imbalance
  • Resources, strategies and interventions that can be used to alleviate the distress caused by an out-of-synch sensory system,
  • Teaching self-regulation where appropriate.

Presented by Lois Addy
MA (Ed) BSc (Hons) Psych. Dip COT SROT, SI-UK

c-Lois_Addy-red250Lois Addy is an independent consultant and trainer as well as the Lead for Cognition and Learning in North Yorkshire, the largest county in the UK. She coordinates a team of services for children and young people with additional learning needs aged between 0-25. This covers over 250 early years providers and 400 schools. She has over 34 years’ experience in working with children with SEN. She has a particular interest in sensory processing differences and how this impacts on student’s attention/concentration, and also their social, emotional and mental health. Her book ‘How to Support Pupils with Sensory Processing Needs’ was published in June 2016 by LDA Learning.

Lois is co-author of the Write from the Start; Perceptual-Motor Handwriting Programme, and Making Inclusion Work for Children with Dyspraxia: Practical Strategies for Teachers. She is author of the Speed-Up! kinaesthetic handwriting programme, Write Said Ted (pre-school handwriting programme), How to Understand and Support children with Dyspraxia’, Get Physical!’  (a Physical Education programme, which won the TES/NASEN Teaching and Learning book of the year in 2006), How to Increase the Potential of Students with DCD (Dyspraxia) in Secondary School, How to Understand and Apply Reforms in SEN Policy, and How to Identify and Overcome Handwriting Difficulties. She is a contributor to Developing School Provision for Children with Dyspraxia. She is also editor of Occupational Therapy Evidence in Practice for Physical Rehabilitation.

Practical details

10h to 16h – Registration at 9h30

Saturday, 19 November, 2016
Webster University, LLC Hall, Commons Rm
Route de Collex 15, Bellevue, GENEVA
Register for the Geneva session of this seminar

Saturday, 3 December 2016,
ZIS – Lower School,
Steinacherstrasse 140, 8820 Wadenswil, ZURICH
Register for the Zurich session of this seminar

Fees:
ASK members CHF170,
Non-members CHF200
(service fee of CHF25 for at the door registrations)

Effective practice in the education of pupils with autism:
How to meet their needs

Dr Guldberg will talk about key findings emerging from current research on educational practice for children with autism and will outline the implications of these findings for practice in schools. Through an interactive and practical approach, she will focus on the essential components of good autism practice and will draw out what this means in terms of the understanding, knowledge and skills needed by practitioners and parents. Karen will also give a brief introduction to the Autism Education Trust national integrated professional development programme to transform autism education in England, which has provided professional development to over 100,000 school staff. This programme comprises three levels of training, a set of National Standards and a Competency Framework for practitioners. She will give participants guidelines about where to find a range of accessible and useful resources to support them in their practice.

Seminar Objectives

  • To outline key findings from current research into educational provision and practice
  • To highlight the knowledge, understanding and skills needed by practitioners in good autism practice
  • To encourage interactive and practical discussion of good autism educational practice through demonstration, practical work and video clips
  • To introduce a variety of resources and places to find information to support practice

Presented by Dr. Karen Guldberg

c-Karen_Guldberg-250bDr Karen Guldberg is Senior Lecturer in Autism Studies and Director of the Autism Centre for Education and Research (ACER) University of Birmingham, UK. She is also a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, UK. Karen conducts real-world research in the classroom, with a focus on pedagogy, social learning and the specific learning needs of children with autism. She has led several research projects working in partnership with schools, practitioners and parents to research technology use and the learning arising from this. Karen has been involved in producing a number of online training resources for educators as well as health practitioners. She led the development of the content for the Autism Education Trust partnership school-based training and has recently led the adaptation of this to Early Years. Over 100,000 school staff have to date received this training. Karen is now leading an Erasmus Plus strategic partnership (2014-2017) called ‘Transform Autism Education’ to research good autism educational practice in Greece and Italy in order to i) better understand the cultural context for barriers to inclusion and ii) identify and promote good outcomes for individuals on the autism spectrum.

Linked-In Profile
Autism Centre for Education and Research
Transform Autism Education

Practical details

Saturday, 21 January, 2017
10h to 16h – Registration at 9h30
Webster University, LLC Hall, Commons Rm
Route de Collex 15, Bellevue, GENEVA
Register for the Geneva session of this seminar

Monday, 23 January 2017
18h30 to 21h30 – Registration at 18h
ZIS – Lower School,
Steinacherstrasse 140, 8820 Wadenswil, ZURICH
Register for the Zurich session of this seminar

Fees:
ASK members CHF170,
Non-members CHF200
(service fee of CHF25 for at the door registrations)

Enabling literacy learners to work with greater independence
through the use of assistive technology

Reading and writing are unnatural skills that demand the co-ordination of numerous parts of the brain.  Without sufficient fluency, achieved through automization of some tasks, the purpose of the reading or writing task is unlikely to be fulfilled.  This can result in a sense of frustration and failure.  Assistive technology can offer the user support and a sense of independence while successfully reading or writing.  Teachers need to be knowledgeable advisors and trainers in the use of assistive technology to help ensure learners experience success rather than failure.

Seminar Objectives:

  • To clarify the rationale for employing assistive technology with those who struggle with literacy skills
  • To introduce a variety of ways in which text-to-speech software can be employed to support dyslexic learners
  • To demonstrate speech recognition software and provide detailed guidance on the provision of quality training for dyslexic users
  • To consider the use of assistive technology as access arrangements in examinations
  • To provide information about both free and commercial assistive software

Presented by Malcolm Litten
B.A. Hons, Dip. Ed., M.Phil

c-Malcom_Litten250-bMalcolm Litten is an independent consultant who currently lectures and conducts seminars and workshops.  He tutors and trains teachers at Bath Spa University, tutors individual pupils, and trains a variety of people to use speech recognition software.  This has included working in Dubai, India, South Africa and Switzerland.  He is a member of the British Dyslexia Association’s New Technologies Committee, engaged in providing up-to-date information, advice and evaluating new assistive software products.

Malcolm worked for over 40 years as an English teacher, half of that time at Mark College, a specialist school for dyslexic pupils established by Dr Steve Chinn.  Early on in his time at Mark College, he realised the importance of features of computer technology, such as spell checkers and text-to-speech software, as a means of providing support for dyslexics in their reading and writing.  This was explored in his thesis for his M. Phil.  Later, he developed the use of speech recognition software with pupils, working with innovators of additional software to support dyslexic users.

He aims to spread good practice in the use of assistive technology much more widely because he believes it will make a significant difference to dyslexics’ experience of education and what they are able to achieve.

He has produced a book called ‘Writer’s Wordstore’ designed to help children develop their creative use of language by providing lists of appropriate vocabulary alongside photographic and poetic stimuli.

Practical details

18h30 to 21h30 – Registration at 18h

Wednesday 1 March 2017,
ZIS – Lower School,
Steinacherstrasse 140, 8820 Wadenswil, ZURICH
Register for the Zurich session of this seminar

Thursday 2 March 2017
Webster University, LLC Hall, Commons Rm
Route de Collex 15, Bellevue, GENEVA
Register for the Geneva session of this seminar

Fees:
ASK members CHF170,
Non-members CHF200
(service fee of CHF25 for at the door registrations)

Understanding Dyscalculia and Numeracy Difficulties:
making sense of fractions, measurement and data

This talk considers how to teach fractions and measurement by using multi-sensory methods. There will be suggestions for practical ideas for modelling, talking, drawing and writing about fractions, measurement and data to help pupils develop competence and confidence when working with data.

Fractions, decimals and percentages are different ways of expressing the same idea – the part-whole relationship.  Before they embark on fraction work, pupils need a sound understanding of whole numbers and how they relate to each other.  They also need to understand the relationship between discrete (counting) numbers and continuous (measuring) numbers. The number line is the basis of all measurement which plays a key role in the way that data is gathered and then presented in graphs. The number line is also an invaluable tool for working with fractions.

Seminar objectives:

  • Provide practical ideas for teaching fractions and measurement using multi-sensory methods
  • Develop an understanding and reasoning based approach to using fractions and measurement to convey and interpret data

Presented by Patricia Babtie
Dyscalculia consultant, lecturer and author

babite

Patricia Babtie is an SEN teacher, lecturer and author who specialises in dyscalculia and numeracy difficulties. She has taught adults as well as working at Emerson House, a specialist centre in London, and in state and independent schools. She is particularly interested in devising ways to integrate SEN interventions into classroom teaching.

Patricia is co-author, with Jane Emerson, of the teaching books The Dyscalculia Assessment and The Dyscalculia Solution: Teaching number sense as well as Understanding Dyscalculia and Numeracy Difficulties: a guide for parents, teachers and other professionals.  A new book called 100 Ideas for Primary Teachers: Numeracy Difficulties and Dyscalculia is to be released later this year.

Patricia has worked with Emeritus Professor Brian Butterworth and other researchers at London University to try to integrate the findings from educational neuroscience into effective numeracy teaching, as well as collaborating on a project run by Professor Diana Laurillard of the London Knowledge Lab to the develop digital games and activities to improve basic numeracy.

Practical details

18h30 to 21h30 – Registration at 18h

Tuesday March 29th 2017
Webster University, LLC Hall, Commons Rm
Route de Collex 15, Bellevue, GENEVA
Register for the Geneva session of this seminar

Wednesday March 30th
ZIS – Lower School,
Steinacherstrasse 140, 8820 Wadenswil, ZURICH
Register for the Zurich session of this seminar

Fees:
ASK members CHF170,
Non-members CHF200
(service fee of CHF25 for at the door registrations)

Past ASK Seminars and Speakers