ASK Annual Seminar Series

How Dyslexics Learn

As many as 10% of children experience dyslexic difficulties. Dr. Saunders will explore the difficulties that underpin dyslexia and how these impact on learning, but also the potential learning strengths of the dyslexic individuals.

Practical examples will be given of teaching techniques utilising these strengths to overcome the weaknesses. Golden rules of dyslexia teaching, including multisensory teaching and dyslexia friendly classroom teaching will be explored.

Course objectives

  • Understanding what underlies dyslexic learning
  • Understanding how to teach the way dyslexics learn

Dr. Kate Saunders

Dr. Kate Saunders is the Chief Executive Officer of the British Dyslexia Association. She has 25+ years of experience in the field of dyslexia and special educational needs, having worked as a Senior Specific Learning Difficulties/Dyslexia Advisory Teacher, Special Educational Needs Coordinator, chartered psychologist and lecturer. Kate has a Ph.D. in Education. She is co-author of ‘How Dyslexics Learn’, published by PATOSS (the Professional Association of Teachers of Students with SpLD) and co-editor of the British Dyslexia Association’s ‘Dyslexia Friendly Schools Good Practice
Guide’.

Practical details

Monday, 6th October 2014
18.30h-21h30 – Registration at 18h
ZIS – Lower School,
Steinacherstrasse 140, 8820 Wadenswil – ZURICH

Tuesday, 7th October 2014
18.30h-21h30 – Registration at 18h
Webster University,
Route de Collex 15, Bellevue, LLC Hall, Commons Rm – GENEVA

Fees: ASK members CHF195, Non-members CHF225, Door CHF275

Raising the Achievement of Low Prior Attainers

This practical and interactive workshop offers solutions to raising the achievement of students with age appropriate thinking but who have low prior attainment due to weak basic skills. A range of evidence based approaches will be presented which help individuals without always needing to give individual help – an important consideration when working across the range of ability and need found in most European classrooms. The importance of compensating for poor working memory will also be addressed in the form of strategies to create “memory lite” situations that accelerate reading for meaning, spelling jargon words and getting ideas down on paper. These strategies have been carefully selected to operate effectively in classrooms throughout Europe, including the second/additional language settings found in European and International-schools.

Course Objectives:

  • Engage with and practice a range of evidence based approaches which raise the
    achievement of low prior attainers
  • Appreciate the impact of poor working memory on learning and develop strategies
    which promote achievement despite poor recall
  • Gain confidence in their ability to notice smart students with weak basic skills and
    adjust teaching in order to raise achievement

Neil MacKay

Neil MacKay, MEd, DipSpEd, AMBDA, Consultant and Trainer, Dyslexia Action

Previously Senior Teacher/SENCO in a large secondary school in North Wales and now an independent consultant and trainer, Neil MacKay originated the phrase and the concept “Dyslexia Friendly Schools. He is the International Consultant for the Dyslexia Foundation of New Zealand – www.dfnz.org.nz and has delivered sell out workshops across New Zealand for teachers, RTLBs and RTLits over the past few years. In January 2014 he worked through Kings College to provide school and college based PD in a range of institutions in the Auckland area. Neil works with state, independent and international schools and LAs across the UK, Europe, New Zealand Australia and Hong Kong to develop inclusive classroom practices – in Hong Kong he is also Visiting Lecturer at Hong Kong Polytechnic University. His first book, “Removing Dyslexia as a Barrier to Achievement” was published to considerable acclaim in 2005 and he has since published “Leading on the Inclusion Development Programme” and “Taking the Hell out of Homework”, which has been written for parents and home educators. His new book, Total Teaching” gives classroom teachers just enough specialist skills to notice and adjust when encountering students without labels but with clear Asperger’s ADHD or Dyslexic type learning needs.

Practical details

Monday, 19th January, 2015
18.30h-21h30 – Registration at 18h
ZIS – Lower School,
Steinacherstrasse 140, 8820 Wadenswil, ZURICH

Tuesday, 20th January, 2015
18.30h-21h30 – Registration at 18h
Webster University, LLC Hall, Commons Rm
Route de Collex 15, Bellevue, GENEVA

Fees: ASK members CHF195, Non-members CHF225, Door CHF275

Mind-reading for teachers – tips and tricks to help you to see when working memory is not working

It is estimated that around 10 to 15% of pupils have difficulties with working memory. This is important, because a low working memory is thought to be the best predictor of academic success. Pupils who have working memory problems are slow to learn in reading, maths and science – and this has been seen at primary and secondary level. The good news is that these pupils can improve their performance if they have targeted support. In order to provide that support, these pupils need to be identified; and spotting these pupils is not always easy. In fact, working memory difficulties are very often mistaken for attentional problems. Teachers can play a vital role in discovering which of their pupils might have a working memory problem, so that they can get the help that they need. In this seminar we will look at how this can be done.

Course Objectives:

  • Understanding how working memory problems can affect behaviour and performance in class
  • Understanding how to identify hidden signs of working memory difficulties

Dr. Jennie Guise, Company Director, DysGuise Ltd

Dr Guise is a Practitioner Psychologist with extensive experience of assessing working memory. She is highly qualified in the areas of Psychology and Education, and has worked in research, and now in applied practice as Director of Dysguise Ltd. Dr Guise also has years of experience in teaching students of different ability levels, and of putting theory into practice. Her main interests are in identifying what will help individual learners, and working collaboratively with teachers and tutors to use that knowledge in the classroom.

Practical details

Monday 9th March, 2015
18.30h-21h30 – Registration at 18h
ZIS – Lower School,
Steinacherstrasse 140, 8820 Wadenswil, ZURICH

Tuesday 10th March, 2015
18.30h-21h30 – Registration at 18h
Webster University, LLC Hall, Commons Rm
Route de Collex 15, Bellevue, GENEVA

Fees: ASK members CHF195, Non-members CHF225, Door CHF275

Register now

The Dyscalculia Solution: Teaching Number Sense

Dyscalculia is a specific learning difficulty affecting the acquisition of numerical skills. It is estimated that dyscalculia affects about 5% of the population. A far larger number of people, while not dyscalculic, fail to acquire the basic numerical skills required to function as citizens. Whatever the cause of low numeracy it is essential that these difficulties are identified and addressed. The solution is to use a structured, multi-sensory approach to teach all pupils to understand numbers so that they can use them to solve problems.
Patricia will outline what it means to have a concept of number and why difficulties may occur. The focus of the course will be on what to teach and how to teach it in order to develop knowledge and reasoning skills. Thebuilding blocks of numerical competency are: the concept of number, the four operations, and place value. This will be an interactive session in which delegates try some of the activities discussed.

Course Objectives:

Understanding how to  use a structured, multi-sensory approach to teach numeracy
Understanding the importance of developing reasoning skills with small numbers so that knowledge can be generalized to larger numbers

Patricia Babtie

Patricia Babtie teaches children and adults with numeracy learning difficulties, as well as conducting training for teachers. She is particularly interested in devising ways to integrate SEN interventions into classroom teaching. Patricia and Jane Emerson are co-authors of the books The Dyscalculia Assessment and The Dyscalculia Solution: Teaching number sense. These books make the ideas and techniques developed at Emerson House in London accessible to teachers and parents. Emerson House is a specialist centre for pupils with dyslexia, dyspraxia and dyscalculia. Both Jane and Patricia work with Brian Butterworth, Emeritus Professor of Cognitive Neuropsychology at University College London, to try to incorporate the findings from educational neuroscience into teaching. They are also collaborators on the project ‘Digital interventions for dyscalculia and low numeracy’ run by Professor Diana Laurillard, London Knowledge Lab, Institute of Education.

Practical details

Monday 4th May, 2015
18.30h-21h30 – Registration at 18h
ZIS – Lower School,
Steinacherstrasse 140, 8820 Wadenswil, ZURICH

Tuesday 5th May, 2015
18.30h-21h30 – Registration at 18h
Webster University, LLC Hall, Commons Rm
Route de Collex 15, Bellevue, GENEVA

Fees: ASK members CHF195, Non-members CHF225, Door CHF275

Register now

Past Seminars

  • Arithmetical Disorders in Dyslexia
    By Brian Butterworth, Emeritus Professor of Cognitive Psychology, University College London
  • Supporting Children with Working Memory Problems in the Classroom
    by Professor Susan Gathercole, Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge
  • Addressing the Effects Sensory and Perceptual Dysfunction on a Child’s Learning
    By Lois Addy, Specialist Lead SpLD, Children & Young People Services, Northallerton County
  • The Resilient Child: Empowering Our Children with the Gift to Bounce Back, Bound Forward and Flourish
    by Laurence van Hanswijck de Jonge, Psychologist, Resilience and Positive psychology
  • Bringing It All Together – The use of resources for pupils with Specific Learning Difficulties
    By Barbara Hunter, Director, Reachout International, SpLD consultant and trainer